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The Difference Between Assault and Battery in IllinoisAssault and battery are two terms that are commonly used as synonyms for one another in everyday conversation. In the legal world, assault and battery are two separate criminal offenses that have different definitions and carry different sets of punishments for committing them. In Illinois, assault and battery crimes are taken seriously and can be either a misdemeanor or felony charge, depending on the circumstances. Punishments can range from probation to prison time, which is why it is important to seek legal counsel if you have been charged with either crime.

Assault

In Illinois, assault is defined as any action that puts another person in “reasonable apprehension” of being physically hurt, Reasonable apprehension refers to the way the majority of people – or a reasonable person – would react to such actions. Basic assault is a Class C misdemeanor, which means you can face $75 to $1,500 in fines, up to 30 days in prison or up to two years of probation. Unless you are sentenced to jail time, you will also have to serve between 30 and 120 hours of community service.

Certain situations can also elevate assault charges to aggravated assault, which typically carries harsher punishments. An aggravated assault charge can be based on the location where the assault took place, the status of the person who was assaulted (such as a police officer) and whether or not a firearm or motor vehicle was used in the assault. Aggravated assault can be charged as a Class A misdemeanor to a Class 3 felony. This means you could face between one and five years in prison, fines between $75 and $25,000 and up to 30 months of probation.

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Alcohol and Minors: Never a Good Mix in IllinoisIt is not uncommon for teenagers to get in trouble with the law. When they do, the offenses they are known for committing are usually minor, yet serious offenses like theft, vandalism and traffic violations. One of the most common reasons teenagers get in trouble with the law is because of alcohol-related offenses. In all 50 states and the District of Columbia, you are required to be at least 21 years old to legally possess, purchase and/or consume alcohol. If you are caught drinking while under the age of 21, or if you are caught providing alcohol to someone under the age of 21, you could be facing serious fines and other consequences that could follow you for the rest of your life.

Possession or Consumption of Alcohol by a Person Under the Age of 21

In Illinois, consequences of underage drinking vary, but the person will likely be charged with a Class A misdemeanor. This means the person could face up to one year in jail and up to $2,500 in fines. Additionally, that person’s driving privileges will be affected. If they receive court supervision, their license will be suspended for three months. If they are convicted, their license will be suspended for six months.

Providing Alcohol to a Person Under the Age of 21

It is also illegal for a person who is able to purchase alcohol to provide alcohol to a person who is under the age of 21. Doing so can result in a Class A misdemeanor charge, which carries possible consequences of up to one year in jail and up to $2,500 in fines. This also includes providing alcohol to minors at a private residence under Illinois’ social host law. A minimum $500 fine will be imposed for a misdemeanor violation, with possible fines of up to $2,500. If death or serious bodily injury occurs, felony charges will be imposed, which can lead to up to three years in jail and up to $25,000 in fines.

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Exploring Charges and Penalties For Crimes Involving Fake IDs in Illinois For as long as government-issued identification cards have been around, fake IDs are sure to have also existed. Added security measures and other changes are constantly being made to ID cards in an effort to combat fraudulent or fake IDs, but that still does not stop some people from attempting to make them. Many times, crimes involving fake IDs are perpetrated by juveniles who are using the card for things such as purchasing alcohol. Some fake ID cards are nearly undetectable, but using one and getting caught can mean you will face quite a bit of trouble with the law.

Penalties for Crimes Involving Fake IDs

Illinois has strict laws and rather serious consequences when it comes to crimes involving fake IDs. Not only can you face criminal charges and penalties for the use, possession, manufacture and/or distribution of fake IDs, but you can also risk having your driving privileges taken away. The Secretary of State has the authority to suspend your driving privileges for up to one year or revoke your driving privileges for at least a year if you are caught violating laws concerning fake IDs.

You can be charged with a Class A misdemeanor if you are caught doing the following:

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Defending Against Assault and Battery Charges: Claiming Self DefenseOne of the most common defenses people use when they are fighting assault and/or battery charges is claiming that they were acting in self-defense. In some situations, this may be a legitimate defense, but many people do not realize that there are certain elements that must be proven if you want to succeed with a claim of self-defense. 

Illinois recognizes that there are certain situations that citizens may be put into that require the use of force against another person. Because of this, there are stipulations in the Criminal Code of 2012 that allow a person to use force against another person, as long as it is legally justifiable. If you plan to use self-defense as your claim against assault and/or battery charges, you need an attorney who has experience with self-defense claims.

Illinois Self Defense Laws

The Illinois Criminal Code of 2012 states that people can legally use force against others if they reasonably believe that the use of force is necessary to protect themselves or someone else against a person’s use of unlawful force. This means that you are permitted to use force against another person as long as it was actually necessary and you had no other way of protecting yourself.

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Exploring Juvenile Diversion Programs in IllinoisParenting is hard work. You spend years of your life raising your child from a bouncing baby boy into the strapping young man he is becoming. You would like to think that he has a good moral compass and a sense of what is right and what is wrong. The last thing you want to hear is that your child has gotten himself into trouble with the law. That phone call can be devastating, but now there is one question that keeps running through your mind: what will happen to my child? Depending on what your child has done, he may be eligible to participate in a juvenile diversion program, which is one of the more favorable outcomes of a juvenile offense.

What is a Diversion Program?

Juvenile diversion programs were designed as an alternative to juvenile detention. Juvenile offenders who are convicted of minor offenses can participate in diversion programs. These programs are typically community-based and smaller-scale, which make them more effective at addressing and preventing future delinquency.

The primary goal of juvenile diversion is to reduce the number of juveniles in out-of-home placements after a conviction. Each diversion program is different, but they all have the same end goal: to educate and rehabilitate the juvenile offenders in an effort to prevent future delinquency and mold them into law-abiding citizens. Juvenile diversion programs typically offer services such as:

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