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Exploring Charges and Penalties For Crimes Involving Fake IDs in Illinois For as long as government-issued identification cards have been around, fake IDs are sure to have also existed. Added security measures and other changes are constantly being made to ID cards in an effort to combat fraudulent or fake IDs, but that still does not stop some people from attempting to make them. Many times, crimes involving fake IDs are perpetrated by juveniles who are using the card for things such as purchasing alcohol. Some fake ID cards are nearly undetectable, but using one and getting caught can mean you will face quite a bit of trouble with the law.

Penalties for Crimes Involving Fake IDs

Illinois has strict laws and rather serious consequences when it comes to crimes involving fake IDs. Not only can you face criminal charges and penalties for the use, possession, manufacture and/or distribution of fake IDs, but you can also risk having your driving privileges taken away. The Secretary of State has the authority to suspend your driving privileges for up to one year or revoke your driving privileges for at least a year if you are caught violating laws concerning fake IDs.

You can be charged with a Class A misdemeanor if you are caught doing the following:

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Defending Against Assault and Battery Charges: Claiming Self DefenseOne of the most common defenses people use when they are fighting assault and/or battery charges is claiming that they were acting in self-defense. In some situations, this may be a legitimate defense, but many people do not realize that there are certain elements that must be proven if you want to succeed with a claim of self-defense. 

Illinois recognizes that there are certain situations that citizens may be put into that require the use of force against another person. Because of this, there are stipulations in the Criminal Code of 2012 that allow a person to use force against another person, as long as it is legally justifiable. If you plan to use self-defense as your claim against assault and/or battery charges, you need an attorney who has experience with self-defense claims.

Illinois Self Defense Laws

The Illinois Criminal Code of 2012 states that people can legally use force against others if they reasonably believe that the use of force is necessary to protect themselves or someone else against a person’s use of unlawful force. This means that you are permitted to use force against another person as long as it was actually necessary and you had no other way of protecting yourself.

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Exploring Juvenile Diversion Programs in IllinoisParenting is hard work. You spend years of your life raising your child from a bouncing baby boy into the strapping young man he is becoming. You would like to think that he has a good moral compass and a sense of what is right and what is wrong. The last thing you want to hear is that your child has gotten himself into trouble with the law. That phone call can be devastating, but now there is one question that keeps running through your mind: what will happen to my child? Depending on what your child has done, he may be eligible to participate in a juvenile diversion program, which is one of the more favorable outcomes of a juvenile offense.

What is a Diversion Program?

Juvenile diversion programs were designed as an alternative to juvenile detention. Juvenile offenders who are convicted of minor offenses can participate in diversion programs. These programs are typically community-based and smaller-scale, which make them more effective at addressing and preventing future delinquency.

The primary goal of juvenile diversion is to reduce the number of juveniles in out-of-home placements after a conviction. Each diversion program is different, but they all have the same end goal: to educate and rehabilitate the juvenile offenders in an effort to prevent future delinquency and mold them into law-abiding citizens. Juvenile diversion programs typically offer services such as:

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How Can an Illinois Order of Protection Affect Me?Unfortunately, domestic violence is a fairly common occurrence in the U.S. According to the National Domestic Violence Hotline, there are more than 12 million people who experience some form of domestic violence each year. Domestic violence is a crime that is taken very seriously in Illinois and is punished accordingly. There are options available to victims of domestic violence to help combat their situations, such as getting an order of protection against the abuser. An order of protection is a legal document signed by a judge that requires the alleged abuser to stop further abuse and to stay away from the victim.

Contents of an Order of Protection

When someone requests an order of protection against you, the judge will decide what kind of stipulations are in the order. There are many things that can be required or prohibited in an order of protection. Orders of protection can prohibit you from:

  • Harassing, intimidating, stalking or abusing the person who requested the order;
  • Entering or remaining in your residence;
  • Being in the presence of the person who requested the order;
  • Going to the person’s school, residence or workplace;
  • Taking, transferring or concealing certain property;
  • Possessing a firearm;
  • Having contact with minor children;
  • Accessing your minor children’s records; and
  • Entering or remaining in your residence while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

An order of protection can also require you to:

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Cook County juvenile justice lawyerThe juvenile justice system was created with the understanding that children are different from adults, mainly because they have more of a chance of reforming their behavior before they reach adulthood. In 1899, Illinois was the first state to create a justice system for children that was separate than the one for adults. Though the juvenile justice systems of today are much different than they were 100 years ago, they retain the same idea -- that the main goal is to educate the child and change their behavior, rather than punish them.

Even though there is a separate court for those who are under the age of 18, not all juvenile offenders are tried as minors. Many juvenile criminal cases are transferred to adult court, which works quite differently. If a prosecutor feels the need, they can request that a juvenile be tried as an adult, but the judge must consider a number of factors before this happens.

Age and Background of the Child

First and foremost, a judge will consider the child’s age when deciding whether or not to transfer a criminal case to adult court. In Illinois, most cases involving juveniles age 17 or younger will stay in juvenile court, though there are certain offenses that will automatically go to adult court, such as murder. The judge will also consider the child’s history, such as previous criminal arrests, previous neglect or abuse to the child, and the child’s mental health and educational history.

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