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How Does the Use of Weapons Change Illinois Assault and Battery Charges?Some of the most serious types of crimes are those that involve harming another person in some way, such as assault or battery. Some people may think they mean the same thing, but they are actually two different charges that are often committed together. As with many other crimes, assault and battery charges can change in severity depending on whether or not weapons were used in the commission of the crime. In almost all cases that involve the use of a weapon during an assault or battery, the crime is considered to be “aggravated” and the consequences are increased.

Weapons and Aggravated Assault

Assault occurs when you do something that causes another person to believe that you will physically harm them. When the assault involves the use of a weapon, this is considered an aggravated assault. If you use a weapon during the assault and you do not discharge that weapon, you will be charged with a Class A misdemeanor, which can result in up to one year in prison and up to $2,500 in fines. If you do discharge the weapon, you will be charged with a Class 4 felony, which can result in up to three years in prison and up to $25,000 in fines.

Weapons and Aggravated Battery

Battery occurs when you actually cause bodily harm to another person or you make physical contact of an insulting or provoking nature. When battery involves the use of a weapon, it is considered to be aggravated battery. If you use a firearm during the battery, you will be charged with the most serious of felonies, a Class X felony. Depending on the circumstances, you could face up to 60 years in prison and up to $25,000 in fines. However, if you used a weapon other than a firearm during the battery, you will be charged with a Class 3 felony, which carries up to five years in prison and up to $25,000 in fines.

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Important Things You Should Know About Carrying a Concealed Weapon in IllinoisThe right to own firearms is part of the Bill of Rights in the U.S. Constitution and cannot be taken away by the government. However, lawmakers in each state have the authority to make their own laws pertaining to the use, sale, distribution, and ownership of firearms and to legally restrict certain people from owning one. In Illinois, owning a firearm is legal and even carrying a concealed firearm can be legal. If you are a firearm owner, there are a few things you should know about carrying a concealed weapon in Illinois.

You Must Possess the Proper Licensure

In the state of Illinois, if you want to carry a concealed weapon with you, you must first obtain both a firearm owner identification (FOID) card and a concealed carry license (CCL). Everyone in the state who owns a firearm must possess a FOID card, while only those who wish to carry a concealed weapon must also have a CCL. To be eligible for a CCL, there are a variety of requirements, such as:

  • Possessing a current and valid FOID card
  • Not being convicted of more than two DUI charges or misdemeanor or felony charges involving violence
  • Successfully completing the required firearms training

Carrying a concealed weapon without having a CCL or having it in your possession can result in serious criminal charges.

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felony convictions, own a gun, weapons charges, Orland Park criminal defense attorney, armed habitual criminal lawGun ownership is not an absolute right in Illinois. A resident must obtain a Firearms Ownership Identification card (FOID) from the Illinois State Police in order to legally possess any firearms or ammunition. Anyone who owns or carries a gun without a FOID may face felony weapons charges.

Illinois' Armed Habitual Criminal Law

Certain classes of people are ineligible to receive a FOID. Notably, this includes individuals who have been previously convicted of a felony in Illinois or any other jurisdiction. In fact, if someone previously convicted of multiple felonies is found in possession of a firearm, he or she may face serious sanctions under Illinois law.

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